some things can only be whispered

you are one of them
humansofnewyork:

"She taught me how to dance. We actually met at a graduation party. I was the only one not on the dance floor, and her friend bet her that she couldn’t get me to dance. I’d already said ‘no’ to ten girls, but she talked me into it. We were together 55 years. She died eight years ago, but I still dance every day."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"She taught me how to dance. We actually met at a graduation party. I was the only one not on the dance floor, and her friend bet her that she couldn’t get me to dance. I’d already said ‘no’ to ten girls, but she talked me into it. We were together 55 years. She died eight years ago, but I still dance every day."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

(Source: reddit.com, via thunderslut)

thebaddestfemaleradfem:

huntyqueen:

Today one of my friends was dress coded for her bra strap showing and so she wrote on the gym shirt that they gave her. It reads “Dress Code: promotes the objectification and sexualization of young bodies, blames the wearer for the onlooker’s perceptions/actions, perpetuates rape culture, and is bullshit” On the back she wrote “You can’t shame me for something I’m not ashamed for”. It was really cool seeing all of the people’s reactions who saw it and I thought what she did was pretty cool.

YES YOUNG WOMEN STANDING UP FOR THEMSELVES
ENDLESS APPLAUSE

thebaddestfemaleradfem:

huntyqueen:

Today one of my friends was dress coded for her bra strap showing and so she wrote on the gym shirt that they gave her. It reads “Dress Code: promotes the objectification and sexualization of young bodies, blames the wearer for the onlooker’s perceptions/actions, perpetuates rape culture, and is bullshit” On the back she wrote “You can’t shame me for something I’m not ashamed for”. It was really cool seeing all of the people’s reactions who saw it and I thought what she did was pretty cool.

YES YOUNG WOMEN STANDING UP FOR THEMSELVES

ENDLESS APPLAUSE

(via queerofblades)

You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you’re finished, you’ll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird… So let’s look at the bird and see what it’s doing – that’s what counts. I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.
- Richard Feynman (via thegoldeneternity)

(Source: alexleefitz, via leprintemps)

(Source: giftvintage, via somberlily)

wallflowermanifesto:

Tavi Gevinson for i-D Magazine shot by Petra Collins 

(via lovelybluepony)

mhd-hbd:

kobetyrant:

OPINIONS CAN BE RACIST

OPINIONS CAN BE SEXIST

OPINIONS CAN BE HOMOPHOBIC

stop using “it’s just my opinion” to justify your bigotry.

XKCD 1357Free Speech

image

ALT TEXT: I can’t remember where I heard this, but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you’re saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it’s not literally illegal to express.

(via bajo-el-mar)

fujoshichama:

airships-and-swords:

theracismrepellent:

go0fnugget:

During WWII, Japanese American soldiers were among the first to liberate the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. “U.S military commanders decided it would be bad public relations if Jewish prisoners were freed by Japanese American soldiers whose own families were imprisoned in American concentration camps,” therefore, these Japanese American soldiers who liberated hundreds of Jews are missing in our history lessons.

Wow. 

See, that implies that our history lessons actually talk about the fact that our government put Japanese Americans IN camps - and that by our silence we LET them. We condoned it. That’s on the heads of every white person who stood silently by and said nothing.
Also, yeah, not regularly taught.

In tenth I asked about the Japanese internment camps because it was, unfortunately, wholly absent from our history textbooks. I asked what he thought, and how they were justified. He said because they were the enemy. I asked him to elaborate why they thought that, because what my sixteen-year-old self knew from too much National Geographic and many summers in the public library, that a lot of the people in those camps were children, and many families who had been born in the USA and were actually US Citizens. He said that it didn’t matter because they were Japanese and he wasn’t going to cover that with us because it was not important.
It wasn’t important.
I asked how the systematic “evacuation” of people of Japanese origin from the West Coast, detaining them in camps surrounded by barbed-wire that often did not have proper housing, plumbing, or beds for the occupants, lacked funding for education for their children, of which many died from lack of medical care, all because of a mass hysteria after Pearl Harbor, was not important in American history.
He retorted that it wasn’t because they were the enemy and it was better to have them in one place where they couldn’t mess up the war efforts.
I told him that’s what a lot of Nazi’s thought about the people in their camps.
I got detention, and a standing ovation.

fujoshichama:

airships-and-swords:

theracismrepellent:

go0fnugget:

During WWII, Japanese American soldiers were among the first to liberate the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. “U.S military commanders decided it would be bad public relations if Jewish prisoners were freed by Japanese American soldiers whose own families were imprisoned in American concentration camps,” therefore, these Japanese American soldiers who liberated hundreds of Jews are missing in our history lessons.

Wow. 

See, that implies that our history lessons actually talk about the fact that our government put Japanese Americans IN camps - and that by our silence we LET them. We condoned it. That’s on the heads of every white person who stood silently by and said nothing.

Also, yeah, not regularly taught.

In tenth I asked about the Japanese internment camps because it was, unfortunately, wholly absent from our history textbooks. I asked what he thought, and how they were justified. He said because they were the enemy. I asked him to elaborate why they thought that, because what my sixteen-year-old self knew from too much National Geographic and many summers in the public library, that a lot of the people in those camps were children, and many families who had been born in the USA and were actually US Citizens. He said that it didn’t matter because they were Japanese and he wasn’t going to cover that with us because it was not important.

It wasn’t important.

I asked how the systematic “evacuation” of people of Japanese origin from the West Coast, detaining them in camps surrounded by barbed-wire that often did not have proper housing, plumbing, or beds for the occupants, lacked funding for education for their children, of which many died from lack of medical care, all because of a mass hysteria after Pearl Harbor, was not important in American history.

He retorted that it wasn’t because they were the enemy and it was better to have them in one place where they couldn’t mess up the war efforts.

I told him that’s what a lot of Nazi’s thought about the people in their camps.

I got detention, and a standing ovation.

(via siphilemon)